14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00

Radical peasants, reformist autonomy and anti-base movements: Tama as an riot region

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
101
Language
Japanese

Organizer

Hiroki Ogasawara (Kobe University)

Panelists

Hiroki Ogasawara (Kobe University)
Atsuhisa Yamamoto (Seijo University)
Yuka Mukaidani (Machida Machizukuri Shimin kaigi)
Taichi Takahara (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)


With the democratic movements in Meiji-era, a variety of grass-rooted constitutions or radical politics in the pre-war era, let us possibly address Tama as the region of ‘riot’. The panel takes this presupposition seriously, consisting of four distinctive papers that take mutually different angles of Tama’s historical and contemporary significance.
To map out the whole panel, Ogasawara introduces a complicated linkage between Tama and the ‘Koshu Peasants’ Uprising’ in the late Edo period.
Yamamoto takes us to the world of Shinsengumi, a renowned samurai collective in late Edo Period, not as a familiar story of obsessive, blood-thirsty youngsters but as an untypical social attitudes towards breaking up the deadlocked class system.
Mukaidani’s paper looks closely at Masao Sakisaka and Kenzo Shibuya, two pioneers of the post-war autonomous local government, and their legacy that is inherited by the recent ‘Machizukuri’ projects in many local municipalities.
Takahara examines the ‘diasporic technique’ observed in some Sunagawa inhabitans in few decades ago who decided to stay in their original lands. At the expense of local tie once deeply lying, they instead got recognized world-wide.
Tama is not a metaphorical name that may represent the continuous history of resistance as riots require contingency and interrupt history.

Theme: Post Capitalism

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
103
Language
English

Chair

KAWAI Yuko (Rikkyo University)

Panelists

Staying positive in the late-capitalist Japanese economy: The case of Japanese railway workers

Kaima Negishi (Australian National University)

discursive construct of new poverty and its counter publics – analysis on discourses on new poverty in Japan since 1990s

MINJOO LEE (The Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies, University of Tokyo)

Locating the ethos-political: Courage, deliberation, and neoliberal democracy on edge

Minkyu Sung (PhD. Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, Division of General Studies, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea)

Contemporary Chinese art: the tension between a autocratic government and an emerging force of populism.

Yao Yung-Wen (The University of Nottingham, UK)

Asia Beyond Capitalism?: Popular Cultural Flows Across National Borders in Asia

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
105
Language
English

Organizer

LO Ka Fung (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Panelists

TAM Siu Man (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
John M. SKUTLIN (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)


This panel explores post-capitalism by considering how popular culture flows across national borders through various mediums like the Internet, clubs, and friendship networks. While consumerism informs popular cultural flows, it may no longer entirely direct them, as consumers take charge of bringing meaning to material objects. Also, popular culture flows across borders in ways not directly related to capitalism. This panel takes up four examples. 1) The popularity of Hello Kitty not only induces globalized production and consumption in Asian cities such as Hong Kong and Taiwan, but also transmission of cute culture and gender conceptions. 2) Shared ideas of rationality, systematic self-control, and competitiveness in capitalistic societies invoke resonances in readers of Murakami Haruki’s literary works in Hong Kong. Readers reflect on themselves and search for life meanings. 3) Sensual dance in Hong Kong and Tokyo creates sisterhood, at the same time providing an erotic space outside the dancers’ private space to construct and perform sexuality. 4) Music, fashion, and body modification techniques transcend borders in Japan’s Goth clubs, enabling identity creation outside the paradigm of capitalist-driven consumerism. Individuals negotiate identities through interaction of individual innovation with social norms in a hermeneutic circle.

Before Resistance – Flights into / from “Asia”

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
203
Language
日本語

Chair

Ryota NISHI (The Graduate school of Language and Society, Hitotsubashi University)

Panelists

Before Resistance – Flights into / from “Asia”

Yuri, IMAZU (The Graduate school of Language and Society, Hitotsubashi University)
Jun, MATSUDA (The Graduate school of Language and Society, Hitotsubashi University)
Yutaka, YOSHIDA (The Graduate school of Language and Society, Hitotsubashi University)
Ryota NISHI (The Graduate school of Language and Society, Hitotsubashi University)

“Medoruma Shun as ‘World Literature’: A Literary Horizon of Late Capitalism”

Manuel Yang (Non-affiliated)

Theme: Youth / Subculture

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
204
Language
Japanese

Chair

NARUMI Hiroshi (Kyoto University of Art and Design)

Panelists

“Sumeba Miyako”!?――Gentrification and HIPHOP in Kogane-Cho, YOKOHAMA

Shingo,Hori (WASEDA University, Graduate School of Letters, Art and Science, Sociology Course, Doctoral program)

Consumption in Gothic and Lolita

MIZUNO Rei(Akita National College of Technology.)

‘Young’ community as the resistance of readers in Myojo

Yuki Tajima (Graduate School of Social Studies, Doshisha University)


Theme: Representation

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
302
Language
Japanese

Organizer

KOMAI Sachi (Doctoral Program in Modern Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba)

Commentator

齊藤 愛(近代日本文化研究者)

Panelists

Eyes on the “Others” : Reconstruction of Japanese Relations with Outsiders in Modern Japan

OISHI Akane (Master’s Program in Modern Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba)
SHINOHARA Hanako (Doctoral Program in Modern Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba)
KOMAI Sachi (Doctoral Program in Modern Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba)

Asian Spies in the JSDF films: Comparing ‘Aegis’ with ‘Detective Conan: Private Eye in the Distant Sea’

Noriko SUDO (Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts & Music, Part-time Lecturer)