14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30

How to Make Stories after 311: Reimaging Lost “Home/Memory/Landscape”

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30
Room No.
101
Language
Japanese

Organizer

SUGITA Konomi (Hitotsubashi University)

Panelists

SUGITA Konomi (Hitotsubashi University)
Shiga, Izumi (Novelist)
Yamanashi, Makiko (Researcher & Hemslojdhuset, Cultural event coordinator, Ph. D)
Nakagaki, Kotaro (Daito Bunka University)


How have creators reacted to 311 and expressed themselves since? This panel session consists of interdisciplinary presenters from literature, film, drama, manga, anime, and other areas of popular culture. Today, about two years since 311, people have returned to their ordinary lives; however, in certain areas, time is indefinitely stuck on that day or the people have suffered to overcome the terrible predicament of nuclear contamination. Their problems tend to be invisible in fictional works and heartwarming stories with happy endings. First, SHIGA, a novelist, is the winner of the Dazai prize (2004). Born in Minamisōma, Fukushima, he published his nonfiction book, Fukushima Drifters, at his own expense. This book project is based on his collaboration in the film No Trespassing Area: Our Home Town, directed by Takemitsu SATO. Since his debut, SHIGA has focused on depicting local communities and landscapes. The second presenter, SUGITA, an independent filmmaker, will present her project about locality themes. The third presenter, YAMANASHI, is the author of A History of the Takarazuka Revue since 1914: Modernity, Girls’ Culture, Japan Pop. She will analyze an experimental project by the Japanese dramatist group Port B. This project features a video installation on a trailer truck touring Tokyo and Fukushima, beyond the theatrical stage. Finally, NAKAGAKI will overview the latest tendencies in fictional works in dealing with 311. After each presentation, the panel will invite a dialog with the audience.

Theme: Transfer / Immigration

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30
Room No.
103
Language
English

Organizer

Park Jeongjun (Doctoral Candidate in Comparative Literature at Seoul National University)

Panelists

Reading ‘Diaspora’ Narrative –Against New Racism and Global Poverty–

Sim Jeongmyoung (Doctoral Candidate at Osaka University)

From Reconciliation to Appropriation: Chūgoku Zanryū Nihonjin

Amanda Weiss (The University of Tokyo)

Theme: Social Theory

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30
Room No.
105
Language
English

Chair

SUZUKI Shinichiro (Kwansei Gakuin University)

Panelists

Democracy under siege? Systemic view of tele-mediated democracy in the case of Taiwan’s political discussion programs

Shih-che Tang (Department of Communication, National Chung Cheng University)

Post-capitalist subjectivity: theorizing beyond Uno Tsunehiro and Azuma Hiroki

Dr Christopher Howard (Chongqing University, China)

Theme: Memory

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30
Room No.
203
Language
Japanese、Chinese

Organizer

Emiko KARAKAWA (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)

Panelists

The Politics of Commemorating Violence

Emiko KARAKAWA (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Eri KITADA (The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Baohai BAO (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)

The 1970’s history of a war between China and Japan - Honda Katsuichi’s 《Travels in China》as a perspective

PENG SHAN HAO (Institute of Social Research and Culture Studies – National Chiao Tung University)

Theme: Marginalization

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30
Room No.
204
Language
Japanese、English

Organizer

Mitsuaki ONO (Ritsumeikan University)

Panelists

Okinawa as sites of encounters and conflicts: Crossing national borders and fences

Yoko NAKAMURA (Osaka Prefecture University)
Mitsuaki ONO (Ritsumeikan University)

Cinematic Dispositif in Postwar Japan: Iwanami Productions and the Ontology of the Cinematic

TSUNODA Takuya (Yale University, Film Studies Program & East Asian Languages and Literatures / University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies)

Multilateral Thinking of Minamata disease

Yoshida Kazuhiko(Tokyo University oh Foreign Studies Graduate School of Global Studies)

Alluring Dreams Repeatedly Breed Local-Communes in a Fractal Way : “Nations”, “Peace”, “Development” and “Mother Countries” in East Asia after World WarⅡ.

Time
14th, July (Sun.) 10:30 – 12:30
Room No.
302
Language
Japanese

Organizer

Shin, Ji-young (Part-time Instructor at Tsuda College)

Panelists

Yusuke Kataoka (Graduate School of Language and Society at Hitotsubashi University)
Banzono Hiroya (Graduate School of Language and Society at Hitotsubashi University)
Aya Sakima (Graduate School of Language and Society at Hitotsubashi University)


Although the term “Reconstruction” evokes a desirable future to come, it is an elusive dream. Whereas spurring people to the ideal “center,” it has ironically resulted in more marginalized conditions of colonized, peripheral areas. Our panel gathers several alluring dreams scattered over the East Asia after WWⅡ, seeking ways to detach ourselves from the dreams and to imagine different “communes.”

Shin Ji-young argues the novels by Ahn Hoe-man and Yeom Sang-sop, which describe the experiences of Korean conscripted into the Japanese army and forced to migrate to various areas beyond borders. She questions the meanings of “nations” in relation to Others.

Yusuke Kataoka investigates the interrelationship between the reconstruction of Hiroshima and its symbolization as “a City of Peace,” analyzing the representational transformation of a teacher in Hiroshima (Japan Teachers’ Union Production, 1953).

Reading Kikigakiminamataminnsyuushi by Tatsuaki Okamoto and Tsuguo Matsuzaki and Kugaijyodo by Michiko Ishimure, Hiroya Banzono interrogates the relationship between the accident of Minamata disease caused by Chisso and the colonization of Korea, in terms of the differential allocation of “precarity.”

By analyzing Masanobu Kiyota’s pursuit for other “communes” differentiated from “mother countries,” Aya Sakima presents the possibilities for yet-unattained “communes” beyond Okinawa.