13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00

On ‘Younger Generations’, ‘Leisure’ and ‘Happiness’ in Contemporary Japan

Time
13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
101
Language
Japanese

Chair

WATANABE Jun (Tokyo Keizai University)

Panelists

OZAWA Takato (Tokai University, Department of Tourism)
SATO Umi (The Association for Leisure and Tourism Studies)
OGATA Michimasa (The University of Tokyo)
ABE Kan-ichi (Seijo University)



In Japan, there has been much talk about whether or not younger generations consider themselves happy, despite rather stagnant economic and social conditions. If the assumption that there is a strong correlation between people’s sense of life satisfaction is no longer valid, what are the determinants of life satisfaction? In this symposium, we are going to think about this question from the perspective of ‘cultural studies’ and ‘leisure studies’, focusing on such themes as the fashion and media for young Japanese today. What is it like to experience leisure in contemporary Japan? Is it possible to think positively that young people feel satisfied while enjoying their leisure time, regardless of social and economic circumstances? Or, do these leisure experiences prevent them from facing the harsh ‘reality’ and understanding their social conditions in a critical way? Traditionally, leisure studies have shed light on the two sides of ‘leisure experiences’; the potential for freedom and happiness on the one hand, and the effect of ‘bread and circus’ on the other. We would like to revisit the above question by taking into account both sides of the argument on leisure experiences.

Gender, Politics, and Family Value: Reading Manga from Post-311 Perspectives

Time
13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
103
Language
English

Organizer

Akiko Sugawa-Shimada (Kansai Gaidai University)

Panelists

Akiko Sugawa-Shimada (Kansai Gaidai University)
Ming Hung (Alex) Tu (Tamkang University, Taiwan)
Hyojin Kim (Korea University, South Korea)
Kotaro Nakagaki (Daito Bunka University)



Manga is inherently implicated in networks of various forms and platforms of politics and expressions, even more so after 311. This panel explores how post-311 gender and family politics, ethics, and/or future visions are depicted in Japanese manga, and how these expressions discursively challenge post-311 dominant discourses in mass media by analyzing documentary manga, shojo manga, Sci-fi manga, ladies comics, and essay manga.
By comparing works such as Shiriagari Kotobuki’s Manga Since That Day, Yuumi Eko’s One Year after 311: 13 Off-record Stories and Hagio Moto’s Nanohana, Tu examines how post-311 comics invent ways of “seeing through” invisible radiation and disaster as well as how these fabulations may lead to alternative concepts and treatment of nuclear energy. Nakagaki attempts to re-visit apocalyptic narratives in The Drifting Class Room (1973), Dragon Head (1995), and COPPELION (2008), and consider functions and possibilities of sci-fi imagination to express natural disasters and nuclear crisis. Sugawa-Shimada explores how female seinen/essay manga artists such as Ranjo Miyake use the form of manga for constructing a psychological safe place for survivors, by focusing on a charity manga anthology, Our Manga (2012). Kim analyzes how Ladies’ Comics depicts and interprets women’s 311 experiences, as an effective medium for overcoming traumas, through familiarizing extraordinary experiences in terms of traditional virtues such as parental love.

Alternate Media Worlds and Precarious Consumption After 3.11

Time
13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
105
Language
English

Chair

David Slater (Professor at Sophia University)

Panelists

Jason G. KARLIN (University of Tokyo)
Nicolas Sternsdorff Cisterna (PhD candidate at Harvard University)
Patrick W. GALBRAITH (Duke University)
Keiko NISHIMURA (Independent Scholar)



The Japanese mainstream media’s relentless promotion of idols in the period after the triple disaster in Fukushima is a reflection of the importance of consumption to Japan’s precarious post-industrial economy. Rather than a sign of economic prosperity, the intensification of the idol industry in recent years, after a period of decline in the 1990s, is a product of Japan’s unsustainable consumption-based media system thrown into crisis by globalization and convergence. Through spectacles of mediated suffering, the mass media desperately seeks to re-constitute audiences who have become cynical and disillusioned with its disposable, tabloid culture. In the wake of this crisis in capitalism, the potential for alternate media worlds arises among groups empowered through new media technologies and forms of social organization. The papers on this panel will examine how the mainstream media is clinging to power through the domestication of suffering, sacrifice, and spectacle in the period after 3.11. Austerity measures that echoed the rhetoric of wartime conservationism have confronted the grim reality of an economy that thrives on affective consumer economics. In addition to critiquing the current media system, the presenters will discuss post-capitalist alternatives to the current media economy in Japan.

Theme: Media

Time
13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
203
Language
English

Chair

CJ (Shige) Suzuki (Baruch College, CUNY)

Panelists

(Re)mediating Bodies and Crises in Popular/Visual Media

Dr. Joshua Dale (Tokyo Gakugei University)
Dr. Marie Thorsten (Doshisha University)
CJ (Shige) Suzuki (Baruch College, CUNY)

New Media at a Crossroads: Digital future of Japan

Kukhee Choo (Tulane University)

Theme: Transfer / Immigration

Time
13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
204
Language
English

Chair

IWABUCHI Koichi (Monash University)

Panelists

Immigrating from South to North

Dr Kouam Ngocka Valérie Joëlle (Associate Professor University UCAC Yaoundé, Cameroun)

The determinants of International Migration of Filipina Health Care Workers to Japan – the Close Encounter of Zainichi and Rainichi Filipinos in Japan

Aga Charytoniuk (The University of Sheffield (UK) – School of East Asian Studies -)

Islam, Itaewon and Muslims and Koslims: Intercultural Dynamics of Islam Neighborhood in Seoul

Jiyun Camilla Nam (Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea)

スポーツナショナリズムの現在――東アジアの文脈から

Time
13th, July (Sat.) 14:00 – 16:00
Room No.
302
Language
日本語、Chinese

Chair

有元 健(国際基督教大学)

Discussant

清水 諭(筑波大学)

Panelists

キム・ヒョンミン(筑波大学人間総合科学研究科 博士後期課程)
川邉 凱仁(筑波大学人間総合科学研究科 博士前期課程)
Chang-de Liu(National Chengchi University, Taiwan)



「スポーツに政治を持ち込んではいけない」という言説は、しかし、ナショナリズムに対しては寛容である。スポーツから政治を排除した空間のなかに、政治性をあからさまには装わない形でナショナルな言説、表象、表現が滑り込んでいる。本セッションでは、スポーツがナショナリズムと結びつく複雑で多様な過程について、東アジアの文脈から議論していく。まずキム・ヒョンミンは、植民地時代や軍事政権時代に焦点化されがちな韓国のスポーツナショナリズムに関する既存の言説を離れ、90年代以降の社会的文脈のなかで多様な形を伴って表出する新たなスポーツナショナリズムとその変容過程について考察する。川邉凱仁は、2012年のロンドン五輪に注目し、スポーツフィールドで活躍する選手の可視化された身体イメージを介して展開されてきた「体力には劣るものの、組織力で世界と戦う」という既存の日本人ステレオタイプとは異なる、新たな「日本人」表象が作られていくプロセスについて論じる。Chang-de Liuは、台湾におけるナショナリズムの言説が、あからさまな政治的形態から文化的な形態(文化的な感傷)へと転換している過程を論じながら、東アジアの文脈において台湾のスポーツナショナリズムが、「われわれ」と「敵(やつら)」を構築する主要なファクターになりつつあることを分析していく。